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Diaspora to help India keep edge in outsourcing: Study : HindustanTimes.com/UK: News for UK Asians

This distressing article in the Hindustan Times shows how “insiders” in corproate America have mixed allegiances. What’s so funny is that they can brag about it without fear. And it seems the American public has been sold on the idea despite its implications. It’s baffling.

“Riding the wave of growing reputation and visibility of Indians in the IT sector, many well-placed senior executives (of Indian origin) in big corporations who had moved to these countries in 1960s influenced outsourcing-related decisions in India’s favour. As the networking and mentoring role of diaspora increases, India will continue to retain the edge in outsourcing,” the study said.

“The crucial role performed by the Indian expat community was to convince the large global corporations that India was a good place to get work done and provide required mentoring and troubleshooting assuring that the work had indeed been done,” Swiss expatriate and former partner with McKinsey Marc Vollenweider was quoted in the study as saying.

complainers
Hopeless complainers. They should shut up and start a multinational corporation!

related links:

Outsourcing Institute



  1. T.C. Moore says:

    Maybe they’re just pointing out India’s advantages over other countries to which their company may outsource. It does not say they are advocating for outsourcing per se.

    Besides, outsourcing projects to another country is a huge decision. It’s not like an Indian executive in an American company is going to have a large impact on that process anyway.

  2. Mike Voice says:

    For T.C. Moore

    As John quoted from the article:Riding the wave of growing reputation and visibility of Indians in the IT sector, many well-placed senior executives (of Indian origin) in big corporations who had moved to these countries in 1960s influenced outsourcing-related decisions in India’s favour.

    An executive not having a large impact on a process? They may not be able to initiate the out-sourcing process, but once it is under serious consideration, they could easily sway the deliberations – if there is no competing interest.

    For John:
    I am one of the people who has not mentioned my appreciation of the pictures/graphics you match to the articles. The workers carrying-off a piece of the building was another nice match between story and graphic.

    It is mind-boggling to me that you have time to find all these stories, let alone find pictures to go with them – and still write a couple colums, have a family-life, etc. Do you use a stock-photography service/cd?

    Completely off-topic: Photokina 2004 has some nice “toys” being debuted. I’m curious to see how the Olympus E-300 SLR fares in reviews. 🙂

  3. John C. Dvorak says:

    Thanks. Most of these stories pass by me daily and I just blog them as they come in. I do a couple of original things every week and they are pretty clear. The one on the debate podium is a good example. Generally the blog is not too much of a hassle except when I’m travelling.

    The art thing is a weird knack that I can’t fully explain. Probably takes five minutes or less per blog entry to do it. I’m glad a few of the readers enjoy it. The way I see it, art visually puts the reader immediately into a more receptive frame of mind and adds a dimension of understanding. Of course,, sometimes it is just goofy for goofy sakes. The latter is more fun but harder to do.


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