vegavolt charger

In a recent post that talked about Russia’s efforts to expand into Western markets, much derision was heaped upon Russian tech. Interestingly enough, at the same time there was debate on Russia’s inability to commercialize its technology, epitomized in a pair of gasoline-powered boots. However, there are quite a few Russian companies out there creating and selling real products, epitomized here in the Vegavolt D-421 intelligent battery charger.

Instead of being a quasi-ridiculous device like the gas-powered boots that were easy to mock as a Dumb IdeaTM, the D-421 is a real product made and designed in Russia selling now that actually performs a functional and useful job. It has twin independent charging channels that interrogate the device and not only determine the proper charging voltage and currrent, it even displays the name of the device on its screen. If it sold here it would retail for about $59, but is isn’t available here.

Note at the top of the image above the file with multiple device cables (they have over 600 different cell phone adaptors alone). I got the cables for my Treo 650 and iPod, and added a USB cable for the devices I couldn’t think of at the moment . I performed a search on a similar device here, and haven’t found anything. If you know of a similar product, let me know. I took the below shots of the demo while on the road. See the display? I added the car cord and USB adapter to show the flexibility provided.

vegavolt vegavolt charger

So instead of pointing at gas-powered boots and laughing we should be looking at products like the Vegavolt D-421 for a better grasp of Russian electronics commercialization. After all, they must be shipping something to people willing to pay for it or where are the 80% increase in Russian IT exports going?



  1. JT says:

    Our next mistake will be to underestimate the Russians like we did the Chinese.

  2. Fred Flint says:

    I can remember a time when no-one would buy anything made in Japan because they were shoddy goods. Perhaps the same rebirth will happen in Russia.

  3. Chris Swett says:

    iGo makes a dual power accessory to go with their line of versatile power adaptors. Their market is mainly travellers who have to plug in wherever they can. I got one of their “Juice” units a couple of years ago. http://www.igo.com

  4. Smartalix says:

    3,

    I’m familiar with the iGo device, I’ve used it myself. It is not an inytelligent charger. Instead of switching voltages manually, all you have to do with this charger is to swap a 3-inch cord with the plug adaptor for that device. The D-421 uses industry battery communication protocols to query the device as to the voltage and amperage it needs to power it.

    The iGo also doesn’t show you on a screen the name of the device. The dual display on the D-421 providies a visual confirmation that the charger has the proper power requirements selected (and looks cool). I’ve added a couple images to the post showing it with my devices. Do you know of another charger that does this?

  5. Higghawker says:

    If it sold here it would retail for about $59, but is isn’t available here.

    Any notice of when this might become available in the US?

  6. Smartalix says:

    5,

    You can use babelfish on the site and contact the company, they told me they’d ship to the USA.

  7. BubbaRay says:

    6, Mir has already hit the ground. Just think, I’ll bet the Russians know how to make batteries that survive a Siberian winter. I’ll take a few.

    http://tinyurl.com/2s9doo

  8. James Hill says:

    Is the R&D on this device being done in Russia as well, or western Europe?

  9. John Paradox says:

    This would be great on the Daily GizWiz.

    (Shameless plug for TWiT.TV)

    J/P=?

  10. Jägermeister says:

    #9 – Is the R&D on this device being done in Russia as well, or western Europe?

    From the intro: “… the D-421 is a real product made and designed in Russia…”

    It’s time for you to leap forward to 2007, James… the cold war is over.

    Russia is slowly rising from the years of despair. I wouldn’t mind buying their products if they’ve just been designed and made properly, which appears to be the case with this charger.

  11. Looks someone purchased a new bed,,but where are the sheets 😉

  12. Anyway I don’t see any dire need to run out and purchase Russian electronics anytime soon…. The products made here in the USA and Far East are just fine by me.

  13. Greg Allen says:

    In America do they have battery charging kiosks yet?

    They have them here in Dubai and it seems like a good idea.

    It’s a free service but , while you wait, there is advertising for you to look at.

    The ads I’ve seen are static but it seems like a perfect situation for a video monitor.

    Hotel lobbies, malls, airports, etc — that’s where you often need an emergency charge.

  14. joshua says:

    >>>>>>>>After all, they must be shipping something to people willing to pay for it or where are the 80% increase in Russian IT exports going?

  15. joshua says:

    post number 17 was my first in over 24 hours…i got the slow down cowboy crap.
    When it finally posted…it left off the whole bottom of the post. Glad I copied it.

    >>>>>>>>After all, they must be shipping something to people willing to pay for it or where are the 80% increase in Russian IT exports going?

  16. joshua says:

    ok…i give up.

  17. Smartalix says:

    The fact remains that there is nothing like this currently available in the USA.

  18. Blues says:

    Remember, they built the MiG fighters that have always been more than a match for anything the west could build. There was the famous airshow incident where the new vectored thrust was being shown off. The prototype aircraft flew past nose up (not too far off vertical) supported on its’ tail thrust. The commentator ,meanwhile, telling us that without the onboard computer and vectored thrust the maneuver was virtually impossible.
    Next up was a Russian MiG. The pilot perfectly copied the vectored thrust maneuver to the astonishment of the crowd. The MiG had no vectored thrust or onboard computer.
    It also cost a hell of a lot less to build.


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