And this rant should be applied to the last 3 presidents…at least.



  1. Phydeau says:

    Excellent rant! It is stupid that pot is not legal.

    • Guyver says:

      It is stupid that pot is not legal.

      All the more reason to have smaller government.

      • Phydeau says:

        No matter what the question, the answer is “Smaller Government!”

        Reminds me of candidate Dubya, back in 2000 when the economy was still booming, he said the way to keep it booming was tax cuts for the rich! Then when he got into office, and the economy tanked, guess what he said was the solution for a bad economy. That’s right, tax cuts for the rich.

        • Guyver says:

          No matter what the question, the answer is “Smaller Government!”

          The problem has been government. You whine about how your rights are abridged. Abridged by who and on what grounds?

          he said the way to keep it booming was tax cuts for the rich! Then when he got into office, and the economy tanked, guess what he said was the solution for a bad economy. That’s right, tax cuts for the rich.

          He did not say tax cuts for the rich was the way out. I know that being a liberal it’s hard to do, but do try to be a little intellectually honest. Everyone got money back (including those who did not pay any income tax). How much you got back depends on how disproportionately taxed you were.

          Learn to live within your means and stop being jealous of other people. Your jealousy and others is what is causing the growth of the Federal government and the problems you’re consequently whining about.

          • Phydeau says:

            Excellent example of projection here, Guyver. Only one whining here is you, about the big bad government. I’ll cut you some slack though — living in the Fox Fact-Free zone as you no doubt are, you no doubt have some problems with reality. As demonstrated by your inexplicable fealty (look it up) to the 1% while the rest of us are getting screwed.

          • Guyver says:

            Excellent example of projection here, Guyver. Only one whining here is you, about the big bad government.

            LOL. Not whining, I’m just pointing out the obvious.

            As demonstrated by your inexplicable fealty (look it up) to the 1% while the rest of us are getting screwed.

            Stop taxing people on their income. Go to a fair tax which is based solely on consumption habits. “Evil” rich people consume nicer more expensive things.

            Bigger government isn’t the solution for your p3nis envy.

          • Phydeau says:

            Again with the projection, Guyver. The only ones calling rich people “evil” are you wackos. But at least you came up with a coherent idea (consumption-based taxes). It’s been thoroughly discredited, but you wouldn’t know that.

          • Derek says:

            Consumption based tax has been discredited? How? It’s never been in use ever in the history of the world! I seem to remember the idea of the world being round as being discredited as well. I guess until you actually test it out and try it, you are just speaking out your ass.

          • Shubee says:

            “You whine about how your rights are abridged. Abridged by who and on what grounds?” — Our rights have been abridged by the 0.1% on the grounds of the vile maxim of the masters of mankind: “All for ourselves and nothing for other people.”

  2. msbpodcast says:

    I sound like a ditto-head but it is a well thought out, well argued position (if a trifle too passionately) position on the medicinal and recreational benefits of what is after all a weed.

    Pot is a profitable gateway into the police+prison/industrial complex for the government. (For the so-called felons, its a real fucking bummer.)

    Nobody’d be getting rich on selling pot if it wasn’t for the pseudo-Puritanical position taken by some hypocrites over a hundred years ago.

    We all saw how efective that was during prohibition.

    If only pot had been a profitable business like alcohol was, we’d all be sparking up a doobie or knocking back a few after work these days.

    Unfortunately, it grew wild by the side of the roads.

    Unlike Joe Bronfman and the people he employed at Seagram’s Distilleries (later, post prohibition, my father was one of them,) who were running Joseph Kennedy’s Canadian bought liquor into the northeast states, nobody was making a buck off of prohibition of the Reffer Madness, so … we’re just knocking back a few.

  3. TooManyPuppies says:

    I’ve always been of the opinion that hypocrisy, no matter the level, should be punishable by death. I remember telling my parents this back in the 80’s, that shut them up pretty quick and they stopped being hypocrites.

    • The Monster's Lawyer says:

      Did you kill your parents for being hypocrites? Or did you kill them because the voice in your head said to?

  4. Dallas says:

    I would agree with Jabba the Hut that Pres Obama should ‘evolve’ on his views re marijuana laws and show support for legalization.

    The firestorm from the conservative right would be no worse than his ‘evolve’ on gay marriage.

    This is an opportunity lost for Obama.

    • Phydeau says:

      Unfortunately it’s not just the wacko right-wingers who support criminalization, it’s the cops and the private prison lobby too.

  5. NewfornatSux says:

    Some of the users tend to be more hardcore against drug legalization. Kind of like Mike Huckabee talking about obesity taxes.

  6. NewfornatSux says:

    Their video on bottled water is hilarious.

    • spsffan says:

      I haven’t see it. But as Dad always like to point out,

      Evian spelled backwards is naive. 🙂

  7. Dallas and Phydeau are right. Last night on Smoke-Filled World we spoke with Mason Tvert from the “Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol” The title of his organization says it all doesn’t it?

    150,000 people per year die from alcohol related illnesses. Zero die from marijuana related illnesses. The 18th Amendment didn’t work and resulted in the 21st Amendment. Marijuana prohibition has empowered the narco-terrorists south of the border resulting in tens of thousands of deaths there…

    • spsffan says:

      I’d be satisfied with regulating marijuana like alcohol, but it really shouldn’t be regulated at all.

      It is a plant that grows up out of the ground of its own (or God’s or Mother Nature’s take your pick) accord. It doesn’t need to be fermented, racked, hopped, blended, bottled, corked, distilled, or even mixed with club soda. (Okay, most people do dry it out and ignite it, but you CAN consume it fresh.)

      Not that I’m holding my breath….

    • Dallas says:

      I’m still lost as to why Obama is not backing MJ legalization but I have hunch it has to do with reelection.

      The gay marriage is already past the tipping point with the American sheeple (minus the usual lunatic fringe still bent on black slavery). The MJ thing may not be at that tipping point.

      Even so, Obama should do the right thing and regulate it or at the least, leave it to States Rights like he had it.

      Shame on Obama for squandering this opportunity to paint the conservative fringe and the Mormon into a corner.

      • NewfornatSux says:

        Obama is not big about putting people over the government. He has prosecuted leakers and drug users.

      • The Monster's Lawyer says:

        Michael Jackson was never illegal. Well, maybe when he had sleep overs. But that was never proven. Anyway, he’s dead and we shouldn’t even be worried about him being illegal anymore. Gosh darn, just let the guy RIP……oh, you mean MJ as in Marijuana? well it all makes sense now. Sorry….

  8. Anonymous says:

    Love you Penn!

    Penn Jillette just might be “Hay-Zeus” reincarnate. And if you listen to him closely, Penn is all about respect, love, and responsibility! He’s also a devout Atheist who’s probably more spiritual than the Pope.

    I’m also sure if we look a little closer at debates like this marijuana issue (and others) I’m sure you will see the root problem almost every time coming from religions intolerance than from anywhere else. I’m only surprised I didn’t hear Penn say it.

    It’s not a political problem so much as it is religious traditions. Republicans and Democrats are fine. It’s just too bad that the vast majority (mostly right-wing) still belong to a religion which has a long history of intolerance. Most religious people often miss the point of their very own Bible/Qur’an/Torah/etc. which is to love and respect their neighbors. And history is full of examples! Religion in it’s purest sense has never really been about suppression or forcing values on anyone. Many of those traditions were dreamed up by now long dead past leaders who either didn’t understand the true message of their proclaimed religion or just wanted to twist it in order to gain power/wealth.

  9. orchidcup says:

    “Make the most you can of the Indian Hemp seed and sow it everywhere.”
    – George Washington, U.S. President quote on Hemp

    “Hemp is of first necessity to the wealth & protection of the country.”
    – Thomas Jefferson, U.S. President quote on Hemp

    “We shall, by and by, want a world of hemp more for our own consumption.”
    – John Adams, U.S. President quote on Hemp

    “Why use up the forests which were centuries in the making and the mines which required ages to lay down, if we can get the equivalent of forest and mineral products in the annual growth of the hemp fields?”
    – Henry Ford quote on Marijuana

    “I think people need to be educated to the fact that marijuana is not a drug. Marijuana is an herb and a flower. God put it here. If He put it here and He wants it to grow, what gives the government the right to say that God is wrong?””
    – Willie Nelson quote on Marijuana

    “There’s been no top authority saying what marijuana does to you. I really don’t know that much about it. I tried it once but it didn’t do anything to me.”
    – John Wayne quote on Marijuana

    • Dallas says:

      I agree with Willie Nelson that God put it here and he wanted the sheeple to smoke it.

      Personally, I would rather put it in baked goods because inhaling smoke of any kind is really not good for you. This is a huge market for Betty Crocker.

  10. Premeditated says:

    Maybe this might get more people taking a long hard look at Ron Paul.

  11. orchidcup says:

    From more than 1,000 years before the time of Christ until 1883 A.D., cannabis hemp – indeed, marijuana – was our planet’s largest agricultural crop and most important industry, involving thousands of products and enterprises; producing the overall majority of Earth’s fiber, fabric, lighting oil, paper, incense and medicines. In addition, it was a primary source of essential food oil and protein for humans and animals.

    In 1619 the Virginia Assembly passed legislation requiring every farmer to grow hemp. Hemp was allowed to be exchanged as legal tender in Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Maryland.

    The founding fathers of this nation George Washington and Thomas Jefferson were both promoters of hemp, as noted in their farm diaries spoke of their experiences as hemp farmers. Throughout Washington’s farm diary he spoke about the quality of seeds, always taking care to sow seeds in best areas on his farm. He documented the importance’s of cultivating seeds at the proper time taking care to pull the male plants from the females. In 1790’s Washington began cultivating “Indian hemp” which he said produced the best quality of plant, and noted its superior quality to common hemp mostly grown during that time. Both Washington and Jefferson disliked tobacco, and on occasion they would exchange gifts of a smoking mixtures, Washington reportedly enjoyed smoking hemp flowers, however there is no hard evidence.

    Jefferson smuggled hemp seeds from China to France then to America.

    Jefferson, was also a promoter of hemp, and during his tenure as Governor of Virginia he kept reserves of hemp, and in May of 1781 used hemp as currency when money from the government was in short supply.

    Jefferson believed hemp to be a superior crop to tobacco, which he said exhausted the soil, used to much manure, provided no nourishment for cattle. Hemp on the other hand “was of the first necessity to commerce and marine, in other words to the wealth and protection of the country.” Around 1815 Jefferson received the first US patent for his hemp breaking machine, which reportedly did the work of ten men.

    Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence on hemp paper.

    Benjamin Franklin started one of America’s first paper mills with cannabis. This allowed America to have a free colonial press without having to beg or justify the need for paper and books from England.

    George Washington and Thomas Jefferson both grew hemp.

    Refusing to grow Hemp in America during the 17th and 18th Centuries was against the law! You could be jailed in Virginia for refusing to grow hemp from 1763 to 1769.

    Until the 1820s in America (and until the 20th Century in most of the rest of the world), 80% of all textiles and fabrics used for clothing, tents, bed sheets, and linens, rugs, drapes, quilts, towels, diapers, etc.–and even the US flag, “Old Glory,” were principally made from fibers of cannabis hemp.

    It was LEGAL TO PAY TAXES WITH HEMP in America from 1631 until the early 1800s

    Abraham Lincoln’s wife, Mary Todd, came from the richest hemp-growing family in Kentucky.

    Abraham Lincoln was an avowed enemy of prohibition. His wife was prescribed cannabis for her nerves after his assassination. Virtually every president from the mid-19th Century up until prohibition routinely used cannabis medicines.

    Queen Victoria of England was prescribed cannabis for menstrual cramps by her personal physician Sir Russell Reynolds. He wrote in the first issue of The Lancet in 1890 that ‘when pure and administered carefully, cannabis is one of the most useful medicines we possess.’

    In 1916, the U.S. Government predicted that by the 1940s all paper would come from hemp and that no more trees need to be cut down. Government studies report that 1 acre of hemp equals 4.1 acres of trees. Plans were in the works to implement such programs; Department of Agriculture

    The Volstead Act of 1920, which raised the price of alcohol in the United States, positioned marijuana as an attractive alternative and led to an increase in use of the drug. “Tea pads,” where a person could purchase marijuana for 25 cents or less, began appearing in cities across the United States, particularly as part of the black “hepster” jazz culture.

    Hemp called ‘Billion Dollar Crop.’ It was the first time a cash crop had a business potential to exceed a billion dollars; Popular Mechanics, Feb., 1938.

    Mechanical Engineering Magazine (Feb. 1938) published an article entitled ‘The Most Profitable and Desirable Crop that Can be Grown.’ It stated that if hemp was cultivated using 20th Century technology, it would be the single largest agricultural crop in the U.S. and the rest of the world. In the 1930s, innovations in farm machinery would have caused an industrial revolution when applied to hemp. This single resource could have created millions of new jobs generating thousands of quality products. Hemp, if not made illegal, would have brought America out of the Great Depression.

    The U.S. Government distributed 400,000 pounds of cannabis seeds to American farmers in 1942 to aid the war effort.

    During the three years that the United States was officially involved in World War II, nearly one million acres of “Marihuana” were legally grown throughout the country. For the next forty years, every Federal Administration denied the existence of the film, “Hemp For Victory.” Finally, in 1989, independent researchers discovered two copies of the film in the Library of Congress. Yet to this day, the US Federal government refuses to admit that Cannabis Sativa has any uses, whether as medicine or as a resource.

    Henry Ford’s first Model-T was built to run on hemp gasoline and the car itself was constructed from hemp. On his large estate, Ford was photographed among his hemp fields. The car, ‘grown from the soil,’ had hemp plastic panels whose impact strength was 10 times stronger than steel; Popular Mechanics, 1941.

    In September of 1937, hemp became illegal. The most useful crop known became a drug and our planet has been suffering ever since.

    The day the Marihuana Tax Act was passed, federal agents arrested Samuel Caldwell, 58, in Denver, CO, for selling two marihuana cigarettes. Samuel Caldwell became the first American convicted under the new federal law. He was sentenced to four years in Levenworth Penitentiary, and died a year after being released.

    Remember, just 30 years ago, in 1978, before the “War on Drugs,” there were only 300,000 persons in American prisons for all crimes combined.

    • B. Dog says:

      Pretty good Orchidcup, but would you please rewrite it keeping in mind what every English schoolboy knows: The Pilgrims landed on Plymouth Rock in 1620.

      • orchidcup says:

        Officially the United States of America began as an independent nation with the Declaration of Independence in July 1776.

        European colonists reached the Gulf and Pacific coasts, but the largest settlements were by the English on the East Coast, starting in 1607.

        • orchidcup says:

          Jamestown (or James Towne or Jamestowne) was a settlement in the Colony of Virginia. Established by the Virginia Company of London as “James Fort” on May 14, 1607 (O.S., May 24, 1607 N.S.), it was the first permanent English settlement in what is now the United States, following several earlier failed attempts, including the Lost Colony of Roanoke. It would serve as capital of the colony for 83 years (from 1616 until 1699).

    • up_with_rope_down_with_dope says:

      Don’t you think most of these were about getting
      high quality fiber for rope, not getting wasted?

    • Dallas says:

      Wow. That’s a great story actually . Although the uses for hemp were by far as building material (including rope), the medicinal value as also very important.

      We should all smoke or bake a little weed on Washington’s birthday to celebrate those wonderful times when hemp was an American staple.

    • Anonymous says:

      You just have to wonder if the framers of the Constitution weren’t slightly influenced by hemp when they included the words, “… pursuit of happiness” too.

      😉

    • CrankyGeeksFan says:

      The word “canvas” comes from the same root as the word “cannabis”. Cannabis fiber lasts longer than cotton.

  12. orchidcup says:

    Commissioned by President Nixon in 1972, the National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse concluded that “Marihuana’s relative potential for harm to the vast majority of individual users and its actual impact on society does not justify a social policy designed to seek out and firmly punish those who use it. This judgment is based on prevalent use patterns, on behavior exhibited by the vast majority of users and on our interpretations of existing medical and scientific data. This position also is consistent with the estimate by law enforcement personnel that the elimination of use is unattainable.”

    Source: Shafer, Raymond P., et al, Marihuana: A Signal of Misunderstanding, Ch. V, (Washington DC: National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse, 1972)

    “State laws should make the public use of marijuana a criminal offense punishable by a $100 fine. Under federal law, marijuana smoked in public would merely be subject to seizure.”

    Source: Richard Nixon’s National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse “Marihuana: A Signal of Misunderstanding” – March 1972

  13. dave m brewer says:

    O-Shithead admitted to a crime… lock his ass up.

    • dave m brewer says:

      A little blow… I think he was mistaken by the question. O-Shit thought he said… a little Blow Job too….

    • orchidcup says:

      Good idea.

      We should lock up all politicians that have admitted to recreational use following prohibition.

      This alphabetical list includes mayors, Governors, members of the House of Representatives, Senators, Presidents, and other political figures and officials.

      Bruce Babbitt, Secretary of the Inteior
      Michael Bloomberg, Mayor of New York City
      Bill Bradley, Senator from New Jersey
      George W. Bush, President of the United States
      Jack Conway, Attorney General of Kentucky
      Paul Cellucci, Governor of Massachusetts
      Lincoln Chafee, Senator from Rhode Island
      Lawton Chiles, Senator from Florida
      Bill Clinton, President of the United States
      Steve Cohen, Member of the House of Representatives
      Andrew Cuomo, Governor of New York
      Howard Dean, Chairman of the Democratic National Committee
      Joseph DeNucci, Massachusetts Auditor
      Mary Donohue, Lieutenant Governor of New York
      John Edwards, Senator from North Carolina
      Newt Gingrich, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives
      Al Gore, Vice President of the United States
      Gary Johnson, Governor of New Mexico
      Joseph Patrick Kennedy II, Member of the House of Representatives
      John Kerry, Senator from Massachusetts
      Ed Koch, Member of the House of Representatives
      Connie Mack III, Senator from Florida
      Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of the Department of Energy
      John Miller, Member of the House of Representatives
      Susan Molinari, Member of the House of Representatives
      Jim Moran, Member of the House of Representatives
      Evelyn Murphy, Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts
      Richard Neal, Member of the House of Representatives
      Barack Obama, President of the United States
      Sarah Palin, Governor of Alaska
      George Pataki, Governor of New York
      David Paterson, Governor of New York
      Edward W. Pattison, Member of the House of Representatives
      Claiborne Pell, Senator from Rhode Island
      Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor of California
      William Scranton, Ambassador to the United Nations
      Bill Thompson, New York City Comptroller
      Peter G. Torkildsen, Member of the House of Representatives
      Jesse Ventura, Governor of Minnesota

  14. hmeyers says:

    Ah yeah, another thing on the list of things I thought Obama might do when he got elected.

    I personally don’t believe in smoking marijuana — but barring some sort of statistical red flag that the government or medical industry knows that I am not aware of — I don’t get the benefits of it being illegal and think the “War on Drugs” largely is a waste.

    Most cops will tell you they would rather deal with someone stoned than someone drunk.

    • Anonymous says:

      Penn has also said that he thought it was a crime to borrow money we don’t have to kill people we don’t know in a war that no one really understands.

      (Please don’t be a dumb ass and point out that it’s a war on terror. That’s like saying its a war on smog or a war on the boogey man.)

  15. Mextli: ABO says:

    Must be the dawning of the Age of Aquarius.

    Come on people now
    smile on your brother
    Everybody get together
    try to love one another right now
    right now

  16. up_with_rope_down_with_dope says:

    Penn is such a passionate loud-month. But I don’t hear Teller
    saying a damn thing about this!

  17. Somebody says:

    I’m guessing they’ll go with auto-erotic asphyxiation.

  18. Cursor_ says:

    Yes of course, make pot available for entertainment.

    And while you are at it make all drugs available for entertainment. Why not heroin? It is just seeds of a pretty flower.

    Let the monkeys do whatever they please. No care to who they harm in the process. The breaking up of families, the burden on our health care system, the accidents on our highways.

    Yeah drugs are great for just having thrills.

    Cursor_

    • Anonymous says:

      You are a classic IDIOT! No one has said anything like that.

      Maybe you should go have another DRINK!

      Maybe you should read a little document known as the Declaration of Independence. Maybe you will notice a little passage in that document which reads:

      We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

      Sure. There’s also the Constitution which lays out law. But somehow idiots like you and our law makers always seem to conveniently forget about the spirit of America and the Declaration of Independence which got it all going.

      Do you understand why our founding fathers felt a need to define things like “rights” and a right to Life? Certainly, you agree that all people who haven’t committed things like murder have a right to life. Don’t you?

      How about a right to liberty? Or do you think that some higher authority should be in control of our lives and always be telling us what to do or even what to think. (Then again, maybe you’re a communist or possibly just a dumb ass religious fool who thinks the answer is yes.)

      How about everyone’s right to pursue happiness? Not that guilty people shouldn’t be punished when they break laws. But if the actions of an individual harm no one except maybe that particular individual then why not let him/her try to pursue happiness? It’s really none of your business to stand in their way.

      Maybe if you could think you would notice that no one is trying to step on your rights but rather you are trying to step on ours!

    • Ken says:

      You like back when those drugs were legal and the country was awash in heroin addled zombies?

  19. deowll says:

    Hemp would be a great cash crop.

    I wonder how many of the people that voted for Obama would have done so if they had actually read the books he wrote and they bought?

  20. hmeyers says:

    Clearly, the solution to our problems is to keep marijuana illegal but make $50 bills out of hemp.

    This would allow the government to be the sole provider.

    And if someone decided to “smoke a $50” they would have the right to do so, and the government could profit.

  21. mikem132 says:

    What’s the real deal in California? I visited Venice Beach a couple weeks ago (first time—I’m from Penna) and they had those phoney-looking prescription clinics along the sidewalk where they appeared to give you a scrip for marijuana for almost any condition. Aside—wife with me asked twice about the “doctor” exam—“how much is it” while the sidewalk hawkers were standing next to a 3 foot high “$40” sign. I asked him if “lack of observation skills” was reason for a prescription.
    Can anybody really get marijuana or are these prescription things a scam?

  22. bob dobbs says:

    I do not smoke pot.
    I have in the past.

    I wish they would legalize it, just so I don’t have to ever hear some pothead tell me about all the marijuana “facts” that they’ve uncovered.

    I can’t tell you how many time someone tried to explain that the founding fathers used it, or about DuPont and nylon made it illegal, or the dozens of other things that potheads say. Get some new material guys!!! I’ve heard this crap for years!
    Just fess up and say, it should be legal because you enjoy it, and that you’re not harming anyone. Stop making pot a life style.


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