Anybody else thinking a good approach to talking to someone wearing them is to demand they take them off before starting? Aside from they’re distracted by them, would you want your conversation recorded without permission or knowledge?

Some 10 million smart glasses will ship worldwide between 2012 and 2016 — and Google isn’t the only maker of these social glasses.
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The analyst firm estimates smart glass shipments will rise from 434,000 in 2014 to 2.17 million in 2015, and 6.6 million in 2016.
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Google isn’t the only maker of these social glasses. Japanese entrepreneur Takahito Iguchi invented and built Telepathy One, showcased in a small booth at the SXSW 2013 Interactive festival last month in Austin, Texas. The device, demonstrated by Midori Takaso, sports a micro camera and a projection display, along with a wireless system that allows wearers to communicate in real time.



  1. Hmeyers says:

    I think these might be the next Segway.

    A. I don’t see any mainstream demand for this.
    B. I can’t see women, fashionable people or old people wearing these.
    C. The benefits seem dubious.

    It’s an expensive nerd toy with some appeal to dorks too, but few useful practical applications. I will sell some but otherwise quickly be relegated to a niche.

    • bobbo, how do you know what you know, and how do you change your mind says:

      Smart, humorous.

      Will Google Glass be the next big thing or a Segway?

      An image captures the imagination. close your eyes and imagine otherwise: all the tech in a different package. Not a pair of Elton John Glasses but how about a tie tac/bluetooth combo? connected to internet, this replaces the iphone, ipad, etc.

      Enhanced Reality. Its like a better blow job.

      The TECH will take over. Its packaging will take various forms.

      • Hmeyers says:

        Tech will take over. Certainly.

        But this seems very unlikely to at least initially be the vehicle.

        If it can be used to dramatically speed up work somehow … it will gain “legs”.

        Most technologies that gain traction are useful + cool + have high utility + easy.

        I question the useful and the “cool” parts.

        Someone can put a phone in a pocket, the phone is relatively well protected in a pocket.

        I can’t see that being true of these glasses — and they are vulnerable to damage and expensive to boot.

        • The Monster's Lawyer says:

          True Hymie, if a tech is useful it will be perpetuated until a mo-better replacement comes along. Would I wear a pair of these because of their cool factor? Nope, but i would if they helped me do something. If they are considered nerdy but useful the form factor would comform to acceptability. In other words, they would be designed to become less obvious that your wearing a recording device on your face.

  2. bobbo, how do you know what you know, and how do you change your mind says:

    http://betanews.com/2013/04/25/government-demands-to-remove-content-reaches-new-highs-google-claims/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed+-+bn+-+Betanews+Full+Content+Feed+-+BN

    I’m thinking: “♫… Ghost Riders in the Sky…♫”

    with Ghost Riders replaced by Drones, and Yipee Kayea replaced by a Government Directed Take Down Order.

    the Beauty of Unintended Consequences.

  3. CrankyGeeksFan says:

    This will be a boon to workers who need hands-free access to data while they work – surgeons, auto mechanics, etc.

    One of the articles seems to play down the augmented reality applications for the glasses while playing up the audio/video applications.

    I don’t see the concept or appearance of “smart glasses” deterring sales; not with the “geek chic” trend continuing and there being a substantial increase in near-sightedness for Americans under 30.

    Is there any research as to how this affects a developing mind?

    • Hmeyers says:

      re: hands-free work …

      Possibly. Then again, a surgeon has assistants he can order around and a fairly large view-screen on the wall is price competitive with the tiny eye screen these offer.

  4. bobbo, how do you know what you know, and how do you change your mind says:

    Hmeyers portraying the Fact Free Santini says:
    4/26/2013 at 1:22 am

    Tech will take over. Certainly. /// Well….there ya go. Explain your contradictions then.

    But this seems very unlikely to at least initially be the vehicle. // You provide a conclusionary opinion without facts or analysis while at the same time saying the tech will take over. A “tension” at least??????? Given the Historical trend line of this technology, comically Luddite.

    If it can be used to dramatically speed up work somehow … it will gain “legs”. /// It obviously does that.

    Most technologies that gain traction are useful + cool + have high utility + easy. /// Not having used this tech, and seen only a few ads, the only one not obvious is “easy” and that will come with advancing improvements.

    I question the useful and the “cool” parts. /// Its useful because it is the link between the user and INFORMATION as that term is various defined and touted. Its the interface. Thats why really–it CAN’T FAIL. Whats not cool? Puuuuuuuulease don’t tell me you don’t like the colors they chose for the goole glasses?

    Someone can put a phone in a pocket, the phone is relatively well protected in a pocket.

    I can’t see that being true of these glasses — and they are vulnerable to damage /// who knows? Sold state circuitry is pretty robust. and expensive to boot/// Oh my goodness? Consumer version 1.0???? And even as that, seems VERY CHEAP to me. How steep do you think the cost curve is? I will guess: one of the steepest evar!!!

    Speaking of (who said dat) direct implantation into the HOOOOMAN nervous system==whats the over/under bet before 50% of people would prefer to have Google Glass over their own natural eyeballs?

    Any takers?

  5. Captain Obvious says:

    Ir’ll be interesting to see what effects of long term hyper attention does to people. Sort of what happens to hard core gamers now.

    • bobbo, how do you know what you know, and how do you change your mind says:

      Hyper Attention?…. Just like gamers, it will overcome and burn out a hooman.

      Why do you assume Hyper Attention as the interaction?

      You can wear the glasses or not, ie==only when needed or desired.

      You can wear the glasses but have them turned off.

      You select the program of interest.

      But for those who choose some kind of Hyper Attention activity==they will do so as they do now.

      The “idea” and functionality of Google Glass is around us and used by us all the time. It just a change of presentation.

      I would buy one immediately for installation on my kiddie–and even my dog. NOT the Elton John Glasses, but just the gps locator part as a chip in a neclass, dog collar, and so forth. Oh–another for my car.

      Just be “a little bit” more flexible in what you understand this tech to be. Don’t think of ONLY THOSE GLASSES on that guys face. Even with exactly that–how about some cool Borg Face Jewelry???

      It is… obvious.

      • bobbo, how do you know what you know, and how do you change your mind says:

        Ahhh crap!…….It is obvious…..you will be assimilated.

        I wish my editor would act just a few minutes quicker.

  6. The Pirate says:

    All and all Google Glasses look pretty flimsy and smashable.

    I have no problem with them.

  7. orchidcup says:

    I bought a Texas Instruments TI-99/4A 16-bit computer in 1981.

    I graduated through the 286, 386, 486, Pentium, Pentium II, Pentium III, etc. etc.

    I bought one of the first brick cell phones.

    I snatched up one of the first Roku boxes that came off the assembly line.

    I couldn’t wait to grab an Android tablet.

    My netbook and laptops have hot SSD’s.

    I have a sexy 58-inch gas plasma flat screen television and a Bose sound system.

    But they can shove the Google Glass up their ass.

    • The Monster's Lawyer says:

      I bought Ginsu knives, vego-matic, and a pocket fisherman.
      I’ll take a pair.

      • orchidcup says:

        What?

        No Chia Pet or Air Compression Leg Wraps?

        Shame on you.

      • Captain Obvious says:

        Will you trade it all for what’s behind Door Number 1, 2 or 3? I’ve got to warn you, behind one door is a goat.

    • bobbo, how do you know what you know, and how do you change your mind says:

      Why?

      Google Glass per the OP==of course, only a joke product.

      Portable personal interface to the Internet/your computer at home?

      Why not?

  8. Mextli says:

    I wonder how they will impact the eye? It looks like all the display is focused on one eye.

  9. bobbo, how do you know what you know, and how do you change your mind says:

    goolge (google glass demo) and drink of the pool of knowledge.

    Just 5 of the first gen capabilities. Course===the whole point is==this is just a mobile connection to the knowledge base of the world. Demo shows things you can do with GG that you can’t do otherwise right now without a lot of gear.

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=V3SAS1xpQw0

    Pick your own. I’d like to see the History and Culture GPS linked Info Sites for when I’m traveling. Language translater of course could be a life saver.

    Its KNOWLEDGE!!!!!!

    Thats power.

  10. shooff says:

    I wear sunglasses outside to reduce the chance of eye damage from UV. I can’t see putting these glasses on outside too often. Unprotected eyes in our high UV environs is foolish.

    Inside you will look like a giant tool. Worse than the a-hole’s always walking around my office talking on Blu-tooth.

    Some combo that will be, Noob on bluetooth wearing Google glasses sitting alone at Red Robin at happy hour thinking he’s cool.

    He’s not cool and he will remain alone….likely forever.

    This is an at home device for the ultimate lazies.

  11. orchidcup says:

    Some combo that will be, Noob on bluetooth wearing Google glasses sitting alone at Red Robin at happy hour thinking he’s cool.

    Red Robin? That is soooo not cool.

  12. Captain Obvious says:

    No.

  13. deowll says:

    I think eye Doctors are going to say children should not wear these things and that many people with visual defects are going to find that they can’t. A major hunk of the population has eye defects. Studies have already show that trying to focus this close can cause eye problems for people with normal vision and this is a one eye only thing while you most likely have two eyes.

    Just my personal opinion but these things are going to end up causing major eye/visual problems for many users which is likely to result in class action law suits by the shipload. When the money starts to flow out manufacturers are going to jump ship.

    • Rabid Monkey says:

      They said the same about sitting too-close to the TV. Anybody’s parents perpetrated such a myth, but there was no scientific data to support such claims. In other news, video games cause autism.

  14. Rabid Monkey says:

    c’mon…y’all know that you wouldn’t mind if eventually they were a mere $20 extra charge for your contact-lenses to assimilate similar technology. Y’all just think they are still too geeky right now. Ultimately though, if technology is unnoticeable, and cheap enough to incorporate with relative ease into one’s daily-life ( ergo: a commodity), then I say “why not?” What is there to lose aside from everyone’s privacy? Such a concept has been dead ever since the Atari 2600 came out anyways. We all know the VCS was our government’s first semi-successful attempt at infiltrating the psyche of a typical American family from a bottom-up approach (as contrasted with a top-down implementation). HAR :-)