All these damn states getting rid of marijuana laws are going to cut into profits!

On its Web site, the American Correctional Association points to the $50 billion spent each year to run the nation’s prisons and jails. And it warns companies, “Don’t miss out on this prime revenue-generating opportunity.”
[...]
Some people point to all this money being made on prisons and wonder: Is the industry serving the needs of inmates, or is it the other way around?



  1. dusanmal says:

    “Serving needs of inmates”?! Are you kidding?! Prison system is there to serve needs of injured society and first punish than attempt to rehabilitate prisoners who did injury to the society.
    As for “marijuana excess” – great, now thieves, robbers, murderers and rapists can serve their full terms (and if you are on the Left side of the issue – look how much longer they will be exposed to rehabilitation programs inside, very good for them).
    As for “prison industry” – happy capitalism to them. If they can minimize services to the extent of great profits and inmate misery while still legal – yoo hoo! Best deterrent ever and profitable…

    • James says:

      The question is whether incarceration is driving the profits or if profits are driving incarcerations.

      • Jail Bird says:

        I believe Uncle Dave said it: incarceration drives the profits. So when you can’t keep the production going it hurts the share holders as well as the products/services of the company.

        However, I’m still a little confused since I’m not quite sure what products/services we’re talking about (something about marijuana), nor am I sure who this industrialized prison system is really hurting. Because certainly it’s not hurting any prisoners who require more money to lock up than an average state college student. HELLOOOO!

        • Uncle Dave says:

          If new laws are enacted, longer sentences for lesser crimes handed out, and so on where the primary purpose to fill the jails with profit-making bodies, then those ensnared in this are the ones hurt.

          And then there’s us, the taxpayers, who have to pay for the prison and ancillary corporations to make a profit.

          The marijuana comment I made relates to the decrease in people in jail for related crimes if states decriminalize it. Which means lower profits, which means we need more new laws about other things to fill those cells to replace the lost profit.

  2. jpfitz says:

    “(Drug Arrest Trends in the US, 1990-2010) “There were 80% more arrests for drug possession or use in 2010 (1,336,530) than in 1990 (741,600). Between 1990 and its peak in 2006, the arrest rate for drug possession or use increased 75% (figure 37). The arrest rate declined between 2006 and 2010, ending in 2010 at 46% above its 1990 level and at a level similar to those seen between 1997 and 2002.”

    http://drugwarfacts.org/cms/Crime#sthash.6GarhViW.dpuf

    The prison industrial complex is a for profit war on American citizens. Mainly poor and of color citizens. Having a viewpoint that what you ingest is none of my business as long as no harm is done to another.

    The lovely comment above by dusanal shows the worst side of humanity, glee at the misery of others for having an addiction or being caught with small amounts of crack cocaine. Capitalism at it’s best huh, dusanal. What was it like being bombed with US made munitions, fun, yoo hoo! Profitable to for munition dealers and machine shops across the US.

    • Jail Bird says:

      The penal system is still in pretty good shape.

      It’s the criminal justice system that needs a wrecking ball upside the head.

      • Uncle Dave says:

        They go hand in hand. The lawmakers create more laws, the police arrest people, and the courts sentence people to prisons.

        In industry, it’s called the Supply Chain.

      • Uncle Dave says:

        Forgot to mention, the penal system is not in good shape. Look at the extreme overcrowding in the prisons in CA, as an example.

  3. Wrigsted the Dane says:

    Let me see .. U.S. has 10 times as many cops and ten times as many in prison per capita. And U.S. prisons are far more off-putting and your officers are better equipped than those in the in The Socialist Scandinavia. Following the logic of the above posts, ought the U.S. not have a tenth of the crime we have here in Pinkystan?

    • Jail Bird says:

      Yes. The U.S. should have less crime. That is until you realize just what kinds of things keep getting outlawed and just who’s committing all these crimes.

      You see, it all starts when people confuse opportunity for entitlement. This confusion is then reinforced in something we all call a rat race where money is the only scoreboard and where other groups of people glorify all the hype and hysterics that ensue. It’s so bad that even certain criminals are glorified when they seem to rise above the rat race. And THAT’S why we have a problem.

      The only thing that really appalls me is how so damn few people who are in a position to help often choose not to. It’s almost as though suffering is a requirement in order for anyone to grow his/her heart. Even worse is how certain classes of people are born into piles of money, how they then flaunt it and never really know any suffering (which seems to be most American’s “American dream”). But when one of them falls, oh how we all cheer.

      It’s not perfect and absolutely needs some major fixing. But given the alternatives, I still can’t point to a better system. Can you?!

      • Wrigsted the Dane says:

        No, I have no ideas on how to fix The System. I just wanted to point out that more police and prisons are probably not the right way forward.

  4. pedro says:

    Legalize drugs & send to jail anyone that breaks any of the new PC mantras put in place by the liberuls