Attack of the Blogs – Forbes.com — This is an amusing anti-blog article. As if nonthing like what is described in the article EVER happened before blogs. Geez.

Web logs are the prized platform of an online lynch mob spouting liberty but spewing lies, libel and invective. Their potent allies in this pursuit include Google and Yahoo.

found by Ima Fish



  1. Ima Fish says:

    The shocking thing about the article is that it’s so incredibly one-sided. There’s not even a pretense of objectiveness. And check out the link at the bottom:

    http://www.forbes.com/business/free_forbes/2005/1114/128sidebar.html

    It lays out how to launch a legal blitz to defeat blogs if you are under a so-called “allout attack.”

    What I’m curious about is whether the writer is simply ignorant, so he lumps all blogs together, sort of like how rock and roll, rap, and video games are all evil to their respective foes. Or is it an outright attack on blogs to taint them? I’m certain that if someone outside the loop read the article they’d leave with the impression that blogs are synonymous with criminal activity.

    If the latter is true, and I’m pretty certain it is, this shows how dangerous (in a good sense) blogs have become against the status quo. That status quo are definitely afraid.

  2. JG says:

    Yup. It’s all going to teeter over the edge pretty soon. Look out! It could finally be the end…

    (But just be glad you don’t live in a culture, though [if in fact you don’t], where the main solution to such problems seems to be: If you have a beef with someone’s politics, ethics, religion, race or whatever, you find out where they live and go over there and just KILL ‘EM!!).

  3. Glen Seeber says:

    Attack of the Printing Press! at the Electronic Frontier Foundation responds to the Forbes article by drawing a comparison with the American Revolution. Here’s a quick excerpt:

    “Printing presses are the prized platform of a public lynch mob spouting liberty but spewing lies, libel and invective. Their potent allies in this pursuit include Ben Franklin and John Hancock.”

    Freedom of speech is more than just a catchphrase.

  4. Marc says:

    The shocking thing about the article is that it’s so incredibly one-sided. There’s not even a pretense of objectiveness.

    What do you expect from the MSM? Plus a number of them feel threatened by blogs anyway.

  5. Jim says:

    I love it when a “main” stream writer takes on a new form of expression all the while ignoring the similarity of the tactic they oppose to those used by themselves and their brothern in the “main” stream media.

    It seems its always the people they oppose who are the misguided while their own efforts are sacred.

  6. Pat says:

    One of the first things I learned in College was to filter out the bull from the truth. I have seen the same thing happen here many times where statements have been challenged for there veracity of originality. There is a difference between opinion and claiming a fact and as long as the truth is documented, it will prevail.

    The attacks reported by Forbes might be true, totally false, based on true events, or anywhere in between. These are no different from rumors spread about the opposition or competitors in the past. What has changed is that this forum is larger and faster. The old adage of one dissatisfied customer will tell ten people of their experience, but a satisfied customer will just remember it, is true. The ten people will repeat the experience in their own words, too often embellishing beyond recognition.

    With blogs, because there are no checks, the dissatisfaction gets repeated over and over again, true or not. The other side, the “good” side, rarely gets any mention. Dvorak Uncensored is one of the very few blogs that does actually say “hurray” for good products and actions. It is also mainstream in that certain actions get hammered, often wrongly

    The Forbes article does take a slanted view and commits the same wrong that it accuses bloggers of. The facts might be accurate in themselves, but between the lines there was a lot of missing information. That missing information does slant the article into an anti-blog statement. The opinions garnered from this article will then be re-told as heinous facts, citing only the negative. But then Forbes is not a Main Stream Media publication. It aims itself at business leaders and prints pro-business stories, usually slanted, biased, and agenda driven. On paper as well as on-line.

    My biased, opinionated, slanted, two cents worth.

  7. Christopher Coulter says:

    The main flaw, however, is how seriously it treats the blogger rumor mill. Any serious researcher looking to blogs for facts and answers will be rudely turned away. But I think it has important implications in terms of smoothing things out — newspapers and print publications, that venture into the realm of libel, pay a steep price. Blogs are a form of publication, subject to the same rules as anything else. For the blog groupthink to slice themselves off and cry freedom of speech is the core problem. And once proven libelous, it still remains out there stuck in some never-ending cache. Libel suits againt bloggers and online publications are going to skyrocket.

  8. John Wofford says:

    How many people actually read a large number of blogs? This is the only one I read ( on a regular basis), amd I’m thinking of starting one, but only as a comment area for my web site, instead of a guestbook. What I’m attempting to suggest, in an ever so gentle manner, is who really cares?
    The majority of people are so jammed into their own workaday circle of hell that they don’t really have the time to sample all the blogs, web sites, ezines, etc out there.
    Like chatrooms, many blogs are nothing but mindless eruptions of goofball rhetoric and who the hell cares?
    In other words, a bit too much about too little.
    Kind of like our world wide media.

  9. Oluseyi says:

    How many people actually read a large number of blogs? This is the only one I read ( on a regular basis), amd I’m thinking of starting one, but only as a comment area for my web site, instead of a guestbook. What I’m attempting to suggest, in an ever so gentle manner, is who really cares?

    People clearly care if a company’s share price can tumble as a consequence, or a reporter can be barred from publication because her employer would have its site hacked and its other employees harassed. The article doesn’t bother to make a pretense of objectivity, but its central argument is absolutely true: the absence of responsibility on the internet is a problem.

    We’re all familiar with the Internet Echo Chamber; we see it all the time with places like Slashdot (and it’s so much better now; three to four years ago there was virtually no one with the courage to venture onto Slashdot regularly to objectively challenge the Linux fellatio and Microsoft bashing), we see it all the time with any enthusiastic response (usually negative) to any give person, subject or idea, and it distorts information far more often than it provides it.

    I can’t blog. The pressure to publish imposed by the daily reverse chronological format leads to far too much crap. I’m trying to finish up a “personal magazine” instead, collating all the posts into one multi-page issue every month, which gives me time to check, re-check, verify, edit and collate anything I might have to say about anyone. I think that such a format, if broadly adopted, would cool the frenzy of vicious vitriol that fuels these rampages and – hopefully – allow cooler heads to prevail.

    Or, at least, I can hope.

  10. vaspersthegrate says:

    Thank you everyone who responded hatefully and majestically to this typical Morbid Stream Media clinking crapola. Clinking, clique linking, is the psychosis of mentally travelling in a closed circle, talking only to those who agree with you, and displaying flimsy uneducated opinions as news or facts.

    Opinion. Fact. Truth. There are three categories that should be identified.

    The stupid Forbes article speaks lies and ignorance. Everyone knows that blogs began as link lists by geeks, then not until LiveJournal and Blogger in 1999 did blogs become popularized teen diaries and confessional booths of trivial travails.

    The bad elements of the Morbid Stream Media, with the negative bias, the gloomy frowning faces, the rain for every parade, the coward throwing rocks at the towering Phoenix arising out the ashes of his credibility loss…

    …we hardcore bloggers shall make the bad apples of the MSM feel our WRATH. The blog is the Voice of the Consumer, interacting with companies on a level communication field. This is revolutionary, upsetting, confrontational.

    This Universalization of Web Content via the humble ugly-sounding “blog” is what is toppling the Powers That Pretend To Be.


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