The New York Times

The Huffington Post, which began in 2005 with a meager $1 million investment and has grown into one of the most heavily visited news Web sites in the country, is being acquired by AOL in a deal that creates an unlikely pairing of two online media giants.

The two companies completed the sale Sunday evening and announced the deal just after midnight on Monday. AOL will pay $315 million, $300 million of it in cash and the rest in stock. It will be the company’s largest acquisition since it was separated from Time Warner in 2009.

Found by Cinàedh.




  1. bobbo, what is the value of an idea says:

    Uncle Patso–Arianna has her leftist following. Who is in love with AOL?

    Anybody “know” the percentage of ownership/payoff AH has? Uncle Patso==I can see thinking and writing as you do, but once you see your made up factless position, doesn’t it make you pause? It should, your positions would be stronger with just a tad of restraint.

    follow my example: simply call people retarded assholes. Don’t add “flaming” as that is over the line.

    Ha, ha. bloviating for all I’m worth. True though.

  2. cgp says:

    I wonder if the content providers all collaborate and show the rich people a thing or two and abandon the ship and go to something like huffnpuff.com where it is owned by all contributors, a collective where all can register, and your worth is gauged upon some contribution metric.

    Sure would be nice if huffingtonpost.com got myspaced.

  3. cgp says:

    #35 correction no wage labour.

  4. FRAGaLOT says:

    AOL now offers insurance against identity thief ($10,000) and computer hardware ($1000). And they still offer dial-up service.

    http://free.aol.com/thenewaol/plan_choice.adp

  5. Uncle Patso says:

    # 41 bobbo, what is the value of an idea said:

    “…Uncle Patso==I can see thinking and writing as you do, but once you see your made up factless position, doesn’t it make you pause? …”

    I admit I sometimes like to sound as though I know more than I do, but I dispute the terms “made up” and “factless.”

    Fact: In 2005, Brian Alvey and Jason Calacanis sold WebLogs, Inc. to AOL.

    Fact: engadget, a part of WebLogs, Inc., is still doing well. People who work for engadget have stated on Leo Laporte’s This Week in Tech that AOL largely leaves them alone to do what they do.

    Conclusion: AOL may very well let the Huffington Post continue to be successful.

    Speculation: AOL bought Huffington Post not because of politics, but because of their success. (Thus the “eyeballs” call-back to the dot com lingo of the ’90s.)

    Seems fairly straightforward to me. And I find arguments based solely on name-calling to be useless, annoying, a waste of time and electricity as well as counter-productive.

  6. bobbo, what is the value of an idea says:

    Uncle Patso==you facts are irrelevant to my complaint/challenge: what exactly is the percent ownership of AH of the Huff Po website. Simple question, really almost uninteresting except that you raised the issue by pure speculation. If you won’t admit that your speculation is “made up and factless”, then what does speculation mean in your jargon?

    Seems fairly straightforward to me. And I find arguments based solely on name-calling to be useless, annoying, a waste of time and electricity as well as counter-productive. Who does that? And is being counterfactual better or worse than being made up/factless/or speculative?

  7. Rich says:

    Arianna Puffenstuff- She Gives Too Little and I’ve Had Enough

  8. Glenn E. says:

    I wonder how the folks at Engadget, TechCrunch, feel about Arianna being their boss, now?

    Seems she’s flip-flopped on her political views, often enough. They’re “liberal” now. But she could flip back to pseudo-conservative at any time. Women! Whenever I’m pushing a cart around in the grocery store. I’m no longer surprise at how often women there change their minds about which direction to go. For them, they should just design carts with handles that wrap completely around. So there’s no front, back, or sideways to them. And they can be spun around on a dime.

    I’s say that women in politics often seem to have the same lack of directional commitment. They may have a “liberal” or “conservative” label. But what they’ll stand for, from one issue to the next, is anyone’s guess. So maybe they ought to have their own party. Oh wait, I think that’s the Tea Party.