Click pic to start your tour

Click the blue dots on the map to place yourself, then each picture is actually a panorama, so click the arrows at the bottom to rotate around.

Found by plane buff, Brother Uncle Don



  1. Mr Diesel says:

    Maybe I’m a little biased living relatively close by but if you ever go through Dayton or spend any time there you have to go in person to see the museum. No one I have ever talked to regretted taking the time, even if it is a quick tour.

  2. Mr Diesel says:

    Oh, and if you do get there it is is on Springfield St, in Riverside. If you drive to the west on that street it runs into Third St which after going through downtown Dayton takes you across the Miami River and the Wright Cycle shop is over there off Third.

    FYI

  3. I’ll second what Mr. Diesel said. It’s free to get in and it’s amazing.

    The last time I was there, an older man came up to me while I was looking at WWII bomber. He was technician for the Air Force in WWII and his primary responsibility was to repair the bomber. He was brought in to restore the plane. Amazing stuff.

  4. MikeN says:

    The Air Force that Uncle Dave would oppose if they are attacking America’s enemies who seek to destroy it, based on the last post.

    • Uncle Dave says:

      Really? Did I say I wanted to end the air force? I don’t think so.

      What I want is to reduce the military significantly by, as a start:
      – Stop being the world’s policeman by shutting down many bases in places that can take care of themselves.
      – Stop ordering hardware even the military doesn’t want. Yes, there are planes on this list.
      – Radically change the way we buy stuff so that legalized stealing… er, um… correction… cost overruns are eliminated.

      And those I with only a casual knowledge of things military can think of off the top of my head. I’m sure there are lots more items that can be eliminated. Think of all that wasted money that could be used to lower the debt so that your wealthy friends don’t have to have their taxes raised.

  5. The Monster's Lawyer says:

    Thanks for the link Uncle Dave! Great site.

  6. UncDon says:

    Moving the camera is easier with the arrow keys on your keyboard.

    Hover the mouse over any particular aircraft to see what it is.

  7. sargasso_c says:

    There is a Junkers JU-52 in the carpark!

  8. bobbo, the pragmatic existential evangelical anti-theist says:

    I still want a Holo Deck.

  9. Admfubar says:

    Havent been to wright/patterson in about 20 years, they have certainly upgraded the facilty, I’ll have to take my nephew again.. :)

  10. Gary says:

    When your there, stop and say Hi to the MH-53 in the Cold War gallery. I flew that aircraft when it was an HH-53 in Vietnam. Going downtown to rescue down pilots. Then again after it was converted to a MH-53, and we led a flight of Army AH-64’s into Iraq to take out a radar site.

    It is an old friend with a stellar history!

  11. brainout says:

    Thank you for this post on the Museum. I visited it YEARS ago and have been dreaming of having the time to go back. Via your post, I can have at least an appetizer, every now and then. Thank you again.

  12. Glenn E. says:

    I question what a “The Holocaust”, section between the “Early Years” and “WWII” section, has anything to do with the Air Force? But obviously some major museum financier wanted it so. Guess who.

    Not surprising, this museum is mostly a PR project to keep the Taxpayers enamored with the Military Industrial Complex and Aerospace & Defense in general. So basically it’s the Disneyland of the USAF. Without the rides. And your tax dollar probably footed the bill for most of it. Enjoy.

    I saw a similar, (but smaller?) Aerospace museum near Dulles International Airport, in Virginia. The National Air & Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center. Part of the Smithsonian Institution. It was impressive and worth the trip. My sister and brother in-law invited me to go, on my birthday. But I was always mindful of the huge expenditure of money, it represented, that could have gone into something far more useful to improving non-military society. Why do we need all these “Churches” to the waste of War and Conflict? With a bit of Cold War tainted Space Exploration throw in as cake frosting.

    So, just how many Aerospace museums to we need in the US? I’ve been to both of the Smithsonian’s. And now I see there’s this one in Dayton OH. Which features a copy of the Wright Brothers’ plane. Because I doubt they build that many originals, to be in every museum I’ve seen them in.

    • brainout says:

      I’m trying to imagine if one can make a more uninformed post than this: “I question what a “The Holocaust”, section between the “Early Years” and “WWII” section, has anything to do with the Air Force? But obviously some major museum financier wanted it so. Guess who.

      Not surprising, this museum is mostly a PR project to keep the Taxpayers enamored with the Military Industrial Complex and Aerospace & Defense in general. So basically it’s the Disneyland of the USAF. Without the rides. And your tax dollar probably footed the bill for most of it. Enjoy.”

      Not surprising, that you don’t realize the history of WWII and how those planes and especially the pilots, helped save lives; so of course you inaccurately ‘conclude’ that the purpose of the museum is to glorify some hallucinated conspiracy. The pilots who flew and DIED in those planes were not conspirators, were they? Your FREEDOM is in part thanks to those people, and if the aircraft hadn’t worked so well, you’d be goose-stepping by now. Hitler sold the very argument you buy. So maybe you’d have been one of the earlier Nazi’s, had you lived in Germany back then.

      I’m so glad most people are not as uninformed. WE WANT museums like this, and we visit them by the millions, because WE WANT to remember. That’s why they stay afloat.

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