Behind closed doors, textbook reviewers appointed by the Texas State Board of Education are pushing to inject creationism into teaching materials that will be adopted statewide in high schools this year, according to new documents obtained by watchdog groups. Records show that the textbook reviewers made ideological objections to material on evolution and climate change in science textbooks from at least seven publishers, including several of the nation’s largest publishing houses. Failing to obtain a review panel’s top rating can make it harder for publishers to sell their textbooks to school districts, and can even lead the state to reject the books altogether.

“Once again, culture warriors in the state board are putting Texas at risk of becoming a national laughingstock on science education,” said Kathy Miller, the president of the Texas Freedom Network, a nonprofit group that monitors religious extremists…

What’s more, because Texas has one of the nation’s largest public-school systems, publishers tend to tailor their textbooks for that market and then sell the same texts to the rest of America.

Few of the textbook reviewers who were critical of the teaching of evolution and climate change possessed any scientific credentials, according to NCSE. Among those who did, several were active in anti-evolution organizations such as the Discovery Institute.

According to the groups, the Texas Education Agency has declined to release documents showing what changes, if any, the publishers have agreed to make in response to these reviews. A public hearing on the books will take place next week in Austin, followed by a final vote to approve or reject them in November.

The article includes examples of the spooky crap nutballs would substitute for science.



  1. Porky Rottenham says:

    God could do anything, right? If so, then God created evolution. God created climate change. God created UFOs. You have been warned not to follow the teachings of men, but you ignore the warning, and think yourselves to be godly at the same time.

    • bobbo, the pragmatic existential evangelical anti-theist says:

      The natural consequence of this reasoning, sarcastic or otherwise, is to make the bible meaningless. Perhaps a good first step?

      “If religion could be reasoned with, there wouldn’t be any.”